Sorell Football Club

Tasmanian Archives, Libraries Tasmania, Arch Rollings Collection, NS1553-1-298, Sorell Premiers 1929

History
The Sorell Football Club was formed in 1883 and celebrated 125 years of being a club in 2008 when students from Sorell School (Ben and Brad) gathered this information.

Sorell has had three home grounds:

  • first was past the last house of Sorell on the Arthur Highway,
  • second was the Sorell Memorial Oval and
  • third is Pembroke Park the one currently used by Sorell.

Sorell has played in the following leagues:

  • South East Districts Football Association
  • Tasmanian Amateur Football League in 1963
  • Southern Football League in 1996
  • and finally the Southern Regional Football League.

In the very early days of the club, all country clubs played only challenge games for a trophy.

Sorell were originally called Pembroke in 1881. The major sponsor of the club is Pembroke Hotel. Max Tuttle was one of the best players in the state. His family owned the Pembroke Hotel. In 1933 he was asked to play for Collingwood but instead he went back to Sorell and captained and coached Sorell.

In 2008, Sorell have 20 life members, and with Tim Weir as president they are sure to win another game!

Some photos taken while visiting the club rooms, showing the building, the oval and some of the trophies.

Premierships

The club has won premierships in 1937, 1938, 1939, 1952, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1966, 1983 and 1990. All the premierships are on display at the Sorell Hall. It took until 1932 for them to win their first premiership.

Players who have played AFL
Only three players Royce Hart, Tom Collier, Sam Iles have played AFL football.

Royce Hart was a determined player who was willing to put his body on the line for his team. He was so determined that he got a concussion at least six times each season. When he was at school, he played school football.He was vice captain of the team. He played 187 games and kicked 369 goals for Richmond from 1965-1977. Royce was the Richmond captain for four years (1972-1975) and won the best and fairest in 1969 and 1972. He was an All Australian in 1969 and is in both Richmond’s and the AFL’s Team of the Century.

He also tried coaching for a few years with Footscray (1980-1982) but it didn’t go to well. Footscray only won 7 games in his first two years. He trained the players too hard and sacked the players who couldn’t keep up. He ended up getting sacked and started coaching the Richmond reserves then returned to Tasmania and was a commentator for ABC.

Mark Clothier has the most games played in an Eagles jumper with 410 games.

 

More information from George Quinn interview

The club is 125 years old in 2008, having been founded in 1883. ( Of interest there was a prior club called Pembroke, which started in 1881, possibly changing it’s name to Sorell).

The Amateurs split into Old Scholars and Southern Football League in 1996 and Sorell joined the SFL. It had one year – 2002 when all clubs played Premier League, after the end of the State Wide league, otherwise it has been in the SFL Regional League.

Early Football

In the very early days of the club, all country clubs played only “challenge” games for a trophy, but sometimes for a pennant and badge. Rules were made up at a meeting of clubs interested in playing in that year and then a team challenged the club who was holding the trophy. Between 1900 and 1910, Sorell had a very successful team, winning the Brown Trophy, which originated in New Norfolk, in 1904,07,08.

They also won the Ellis Dean Trophy, which was donated by the Warden of New Norfolk Council and MHA, Ellis Dean, in 1908. The game had to be played at New Norfolk.

The Sorell footballers and supporters gathered at the Sorell Station, having walked or coming by horse transport. They packed the Sorell Train to Bellerive, where they caught a ferry to New Norfolk. They all walked to the Football Ground followed by most of the population of the town.

They won the game and headed back to Sorell. On the way back they made up the following poem to celebrate their win :-

“ Dean, Dean, Dean, the good old Ellis Dean
It is the finest trophy that New Norfolk ever seen.
We’re not going to tarry, but we are going to carry
Back to Sorell, the good old Ellis Dean. “

George Quinn, remembers his sister Connie reciting this poem, if New Norfolk was ever mentioned. George still knows the poem off by heart. George also has a photo of Connie dressed as Miss Sorell Football. She looks a bit like Queen Victoria

This amazing team also won the Hean Pennant in 1907. This Pennant originated in Sorell, having been donated by the Warden of the Sorell Council, Alec Hean MHA.

Football Grounds

I know of three grounds used for football in Sorell :-

Just past the last house in the Sorell township, on the right hand side of the Arthur Highway, roughly opposite the turn off to Nugent.
The Sorell Racecourse. The team played in the middle of the racecourse.
The Sorell Memorial Oval, between the Sorell Hall and the Cypress macrocarpa trees.
Pembroke Park from 1994 until today. ( Pembroke Park was the Sorell Racecourse, until it was destroyed by the 1967 bushfires.)
Of course there were other teams in our area in past times, at Nugent, Wattle Hill, Forcett Bream Creek, Copping and Dunalley, that I know of. And there is a current club at Dodges Ferry.

There were other successful teams prior to Sorell entering into the South East Football Association .

In 1920, Sorell won the Hart Trophy.
In 1926, Sorell won the Hilyard Trophy.
In 1929, Sorell won the Tuttle Trophy

The Tuttles were the owners of the Pembroke Hotel and their son Max Tuttle was one of the best players in Tasmania at the time. He played for Sorell as a boy, then went to Cananore. He was selected in the 1933 Carnival Team and was asked to play with Collingwood, but declined. Instead he came back to be Captain and coach of Sorell

All of these trophies are on display in the Sorell Hall. They should be on display in the Sorell Football Club and I believe that they should be moved as soon as there is a suitable position for them.

Pembroke Park was built by the Sorell Sports Committee in 1983/1984.
The Changerooms were opened in 1984.

The two grounds and the changerooms were built by volunteer labour led by the committee, who were looking for a place for junior football and cricket. The leaders of this group were Allan Lovell and Peter Connell ( dec.)

They maintained the grounds for another ten years, before the council asked the Sorell Football Club to move over there. The council started to assist with the maintenance and upgrades of the main oval took place. The first mowing of the grounds was done by using a car to pull a gang mower. One of the first cars used was Denis Pigden’s green Woolsley. Sprinklers and heavy hoses were used for irrigation and were all moved by hand. Most of this and the mowing was done by Allan Lovell.

Alan played school football with Royce Hart and he invited him to the opening and still has the football signed by him, on the opening day.

Royce Hart played school football with Sorell. He was Vice Captain of the team. Only a hand full of players, who were Sorell Juniors have played VFL/AFL football. Royce Hart ( Richmond), Sam Iles (Collingwood), Tom Collier (Brisbane Lions). Alexander Gilmour was drafted by Richmond, but did not play a game.

Sources

http://www.sorellfootballclub.com/ most of the info above was from this website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sorell_Eagles

Interview with George Quinn

Sorell Saleyards

The Sorell Saleyards were first opened in 1876. Brohde’s great Grandparents Faye and Jabez Little with their four children who lived in Forcett attended the Sales for three decades and also in the Seventies with their grandson Jerry (my dad.) They spent many happy times at the Sorell Saleyards.

Everyone that attended the Sales (every second Monday) found it a time to catch up with family and friends. The day the Sales closed for good was in 1984 and everything was dismantled. The Sorell Sales were right in the centre of Sorell, and the purpose of the Sales was like a Market. At the Saleyards they sold things such as cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens, and vegetables.

The Auctioneer in the fifties, sixties and seventies and up to 1982 when the Sales were finally closed down was David Stringer. He was also accompanied by auctioneers John Denholm and Geoff Brown. Lots of people went to the Sales. About 300!

The Sales would get their animals transported in a cart. The Saleyards were set out in pens, there was a big shed for poultry sales and stock yards for cattle and sheep, there was also another big shed to keep vegetables in. Farmers used to bring their vegetables that they had grown and they sold the fresh produce to all residents of the local municipality and beyond. It was also very good for the local business people, the hotels would do a roaring trade and the local takeaway shops and bakeries also benefited. The Sales ran for about 50 years but now, there are know remains of the Sorell Saleyards. But then they wanted bigger and better that’s why they wanted to build Woolworths.

Tasmanian Archives, Libraries Tasmania, Arch Rollings Collection, NS1553-1-106

In our days these would be the costings of their products:

Sheep:25 pence
Pigs:80 pence
Cattle:20 cents
Chickens:5 cents
Vegetables:1 cent

Over time, many country saleyards have gone by the wayside, but many of the memories attached to them live on.

Dal Hyland was born at Sorell, but lived at Cambridge, and spent many happy times as a child at the Sorell saleyards in the late 1940’s. The saleyard was smack bang in the heart of Sorell, the post and rail fences are long gone and the site asphalted over, for a supermarket car park.

Dal Hyland can remember regular extended family gatherings on sale days with his grandparents, retired farmers who had moved to Sorell.

“The saleyards were all set out in pens, all post and rail fences; there was a big shed for poultry sales. Another shed for veggie sales and different farmers would bring in their vegetables for sale, market gardeners. I remember Mr Bresnehan from out the back of Forcett driving in with his vegetables with his horse and buggy.”

“There was a gentlemen from Bellerive that had a corner shop, he used to go down every sale day, he would stand up on a platform and he would cut the potatoes or the turnips in half and hold them up, so people could see what they were bidding for, the quality of them.”

Dal says the day was more than just a day to buy and sell; it was also a day to catch up on news and renew friendships.

“It was very good for the local business people; farmers wives would come in and buy their groceries, the hotels would do a roaring trade. I had a wag of a cousin he used to call it handshake day.”

Sources
We interviewed a couple of people: Mary Thornberry and my nan Zelda

Members of the Paynter and Green family gave us most of our information.

Sorell Tennis Club

 


These people are playing at Opening Day at Red courts at the Sorell Tennis Club.

In 1913 there was a public meeting held at Sorell Hall to form Sorell Tennis Club (Sorell Hall is now an antique store). A few years later in 1918 Sorell Tennis Club was opened by Col. Blacklow it is located at Pelham Street Sorell. There were two teams in the Sorell district; they were Sorell and Pembroke. The first President was Dr. Webster. The first Secretary was Mrs. Featherstone. The first Treasurer was Mrs. Peacock.

The clubroooms have gradually improved over the years from a small shed to a larger clubroom to the current two story building which over looks all the courts. There was one court and it was asphalt then later on it was covered with concrete. The second and third court was covered with red crushed gravel from St. Marys mines and brought in by rail and truck. These courts were later reconstructed in “no fines” concrete which allowed water to drain easily and very quickly (Opened in 1980). Two courts were added and laid in “super grass” acrylic fiber. Courts 1 and 2 were later reconstructed with super grass.

Teams from the Sorell Tennis Club play in a A.Y.C night competition against other teams from different clubs. Midweek ladies matches started in 1972. Children tennis lessons are at 3:45, 4:30 and 5:15 on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.

Pembroke Oval

Pembroke Oval was first made in 1883/1884 by the Sorell Sports Committee. This was previously the Sorell Racecourse Ground. The change rooms were built at the same time and they opened in 1884. The reason Pembroke Oval was built because they were looking for a place to play junior football and cricket.

Allan Lovell and Peter Connell were the leaders of the group that built the oval. After 10 years the Sorell Council took over the ownership of the oval off the Sorell Sports Committee.

The way they mowed the oval back then was they used a car towing a gang mower. They watered the ground by using heavy hoses and sprinklers as well. That was all done by Allan Lovell.

Allan invited Royce Hart who played for Richmond in the AFL to the oval for the opening and Allan still has the football signed by him. Some of the other people who play in the AFL now and play for Sorell are Tom Collier and Sam Iles.

In 1967 the oval was destroyed by bush fires and it had to be rebuilt. Later in 1983 the council encouraged the Sorell Football club to go to Pembroke Oval and they did. Sorell played in the league called the South East Districts Association.

What it looks like now:
The oval now looks great and people still play on it today. The sports that are played there now is football, cricket and little athletics. This year they have also built new cricket nets and they are building a ticket box and another gate to go in and out.

 

Pembroke Hotel

The Pembroke opened in 1842. It also got its liquor licence the same year.

The Pembroke isn’t closed on public holidays, they welcome guests and diners.

The Pembrokes facilities are Tas keno (the biggest jackpot was $287,000), the pokies, pool (8 Ball) the Tote and a bottle shop.

The Pembroke also offers a pool tournament if you are interested in pool (8 Ball); we asked how much the Pembroke makes a year with the pokies but it is confidential!

To apply at the Pembroke Hotel as a kitchen hand you must be 14 years old or over. The average income for staff is 35,000-40,000 thousand dollars a year.

There is currently (2008) an ex-student from Sorell School working as a chef in the kitchen he makes really nice food! The Pembroke was involved in a robbery but the security is much better in Sorell now. There is a police station just around the corner.

There are currently no permanent guests at the Pembroke but there is believed to be a ghost. The prices range from $700 dollars a week in a 1 spa suit to $1116.95 for a 5 family apartment but sadly the Pembroke doesn’t have a Valentine’s room.

If you want a great place to stay come to the Pembroke Hotel in Sorell. There is the bird sanctuary, the local park, dance studio, events at the memorial hall (Karate, Dance, P.C.Y.C. etc) and a lot more. Come and stay and meet the friendly staff!

Bibliography:
Pembrokes Home Page
Interview with Pembroke Staff

South East Basketball Association (SEBA)

21 tenth ave Dodges Ferry 7173

SEBA started in 1990 to get some kids active and also have some fun.S EBA will last along time and getting some new things to keep it running for instance they are getting new training boards. No one yet has stepped up to be a new chairmen but someone will. There has been no accidents so far but we like to keep it that way. There are many age groups to under 7’s and up. The chairmen used to play for a long time. SEBA has never be close to shutting down never have never will we hope.

South East Basketball association Inc (SEBA) is based in Dodges Ferry, approx. 40 kms south of Hobart. they cater for children aged from 7 years through to Women and Mens competitions. All games are played at the Dodges Ferry Community Recreation Centre, next to the Primary School. We welcome anyone who wishes to be involved in basketball as a player, coach, umpire or administrator.

Sources:
We interviewed down at SEBA to get information.

Sorell Memorial Hall

The memorial hall was built in 1952 and opened in 1954 by Governor Sir Ronald Cross. Quite a lot of people visit the memorial hall because there were weddings, balls and dances The St Georges Parish fair and even suppers were held there on all different days and for all different occasions. An advertisement for the laying of the foundation stone is found here

The government paid 5 thousand pounds  and the council gave 9 thousand pounds.  It was made for all the men and women that fought in the first world war. An article in the local paper mentions the memorials and sports events held on the day of the opening.

The Sorell Memorial Hall contains a kitchen, a stage, a hall, a supper/meeting room and an oval.  It is used for the Sorell market, the Pittwater art club and the historical society of Sorell. It is located on Coles Street and is opposite Walker Street. Sorell is North East of Hobart and is about a 20 minute drive away from Hobart.

The Sorell market was opened in 1991. Back then it only had a second hand stall, a gift stall and a plant stall. Today it has about 60 stalls selling fruits and vegetables, antiques and collectables, second hand stuff, furniture, animals, plant, tools and much more. There are children’s activities and plenty of food and drink stalls. It always starts at 9am. It is held every Sunday in summer and every second Sunday in winter.

The hall has two statues in front of it.

This statue is for the Boer War (1880-1902). On it it says: “This stone was erected by the officers and men of E. Squadron 5th Battalion A.C.H in the memory of those men who died at sea during the voyage of HMT Drayton Grange from South Africa to Australia.”

On the the front of the second statue  it says:
“Erected by the residents of the municipality of Sorell this stone was laid by Sir William Allardyce, Governor of Tasmania.”

 

Here are some names that are on one of the statues at the Memorial Hall:
K.D.Hean 20.6.1916
S.R.Wiggins 5.7.-
J.H.Millington 30.1.1917
F.J.Mcdermott 3.2.-
W.Townsend 27.2.-
E.G.Barnard 10.4.-
C.Young 11.4.-
R.E.Quintall 7.6.-
M.P.G.Joseph 4.10.-
R.E.Quintall 5.10.-
N.S.Birchall 12.10.-
A.Carran 6.10.-
C.R.Young 13.10.-
A.V.Barnard 22.10.-
F.J.Denholm 12.1.1918
W.H.Barnard 21.1-
A.T.H.Bender 0.3.-
P.V.Sutton 23.4.-
P.Joseph 3.5.-
G.H.Long 23.7.-
G.Blackwood 24.7.-
C.E.Kingston 11.8.-
A.R.Blackmoore 2.11-
LEST WE FORGET.

We used a book:
Sorell Heritage Study volume 5.
Part of a series of books prepared by Ian Terry for Sorell Council in August 1996.
Thank you for looking at our page.

Shara & Tayla

McGee’s Bridge

The $20 million McGees Bridge was the largest single infrastructure project funded by the State Government for more than 15 years.
The new bridge was named as a tribute to Dr Rodney William McGee, ESM, who died after a long battle with cancer on 1 February 2002, aged 47. At the time of his death he was a senior engineer with the Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources and recognised interstate and internationally for his expertise in bridge engineering.

The state government decided in the mid 19th century that if a crossing at Pittwater could be made, it would reduce the time to Sorell. It was decided to build a causeway for two-thirds of the length of Pittwater and have a bridge complete the rest of the crossing. The bridge was given a 50 year life span back in 1957.

Statistics:

1000 metres (causeway)
460 metres (main bridge).