Cemeteries in the district

The Tasmanian Family History Society Inc. has transcribed and photographed headstones of 800+ cemeteries in Tasmania and much of this information can be found in TAMIOT. Here is a list of the CDROMs available for purchase – I use mine on my desktop using Windows 10 without any problems.

Hobart Branch put together the series of three CDROMs of all the cemeteries in the Sorell District in 2004. The information on the CDROMs is not necessarily found on the internet. For each cemetery, they include a description, plan of the graves as well as names on the graves. Most also have images of the gravestones with a transcription and plot number. Many of these cemeteries have had further burials since 2004 when the CDROMs were created.

The One-Place Studies group often do statistical posts so I thought I might do one today about the local cemeteries with information gained from the CDROMs.

Name of Cemetery No. of graves Earliest grave Most common surnames
Carlton River Congregational 20 1838 Henry Morriss Dodge, Steele, Thorne
Copping General 359 1884 Sarah Copping Allanby, Alomes, Brown, Burdon, Copping, Dransfield, Franklin, Gillie, Jacobson, Kingston, Richardson, Swan, White, Woolley
Dunalley General 264

1870 John Clark

1870 Emma Lester

Bird, Button, Fazackerley, Hildyard, Hyatt, Murphy, Rattenbury, Spaulding, Wiggins
Forcett – Lewisham 199 1876 Charlotte Jones Alomes, Clark, Dodge, Gangell, Long, Reardon, Rollings, Young
Marion Bay at Bream Creek 55 1852 Ann Dunbabin  1852 Louisa Ann Kingston Dunbabin, Kingston
Henry Street, Sorell 446 ** 1828 Charlotte McGinniss Allanby, Bellette, Duncombe, Featherstone, Gatehouse, Hayton, Newitt
Scots Uniting, Sorell 89 ** 1847 Hugh Taylor Denholm Denholm, Hean
St Thomas, Sorell 124 ** 1865 Thomas Wright Bresnehan, Butterworth, French, Montgomery, Wells
St Georges, Sorell 718**  ## 1829 Elizabeth and Susannah Walker – sisters Bellette, Bidgood, Braithwaite, Davis, Featherstone, Jones, Kean, Newitt, Peacock, Phillips, Reardon, Schofield, Walker, Wiggins

** Some women mentioned twice with both maiden and married name.

## Also includes memorials

Many of the cemeteries also had plots with unknown names and dates due to deterioration of headstones.

Readers: Do you know of a relative buried in one of these cemeteries earlier than that mentioned on the CDROMs?

Sorell Library

INTERVIEW: Christine – librarian 2008

The present Sorell library opened 17th of December 1988. Before that it was at the Sorell Council Chambers and before that it was at the Sorell Memorial Hall. The piano at the Sorell library was donated by the Rotary Club, Lions Club and the Sorell Council on the 22nd of March 1991. Some of the pictures were donated when it was first opened.

Around 1986-1987 the library was too small for the amount of people using it. Eileen Brooker circulated a petition amongst the community proposing that a library be built to commemorate Australia’s bicentenary. This is the building they’re in now. It was built through funding from the local government and the state library. This year 2008 they celebrate their 20th birthday. It was purposely built for a library. Before it was built on, the land was part of the saleyards.

Every now and again they have authors speak at the library. People who have spoken there are Roy Bridges, Neil Davis and some local authors. For 138 years the Sorell library was moved around until it reached the place it’s in now. Until 1978 the libraries were run by the council or the Red Cross. In 1978, it started being run by the state library.

An early record of another library was where the antiques shop use to be, then it moved to the cottage on the corner where Mitre Ten is, then it moved to the memorial hall in the ladies cloakroom, then it was moved to the old Sorell Council Chambers. The children from Sorell School use to go down to the cottage and pick books. During the second World War the librarian use to take the books up to the school in boxes for the children to choose their books.

Around 1980 the library moved back to the Magistrates Court behind the council chambers.

Pictures taken by Brad and Sean

South East Basketball Association (SEBA)

21 tenth ave Dodges Ferry 7173

SEBA started in 1990 to get some kids active and also have some fun.S EBA will last along time and getting some new things to keep it running for instance they are getting new training boards. No one yet has stepped up to be a new chairmen but someone will. There has been no accidents so far but we like to keep it that way. There are many age groups to under 7’s and up. The chairmen used to play for a long time. SEBA has never be close to shutting down never have never will we hope.

South East Basketball association Inc (SEBA) is based in Dodges Ferry, approx. 40 kms south of Hobart. they cater for children aged from 7 years through to Women and Mens competitions. All games are played at the Dodges Ferry Community Recreation Centre, next to the Primary School. We welcome anyone who wishes to be involved in basketball as a player, coach, umpire or administrator.

Sources:
We interviewed down at SEBA to get information.

Dodges Ferry Fire Brigade

Dodges Ferry fire station opened on April 1993. It was opened by Dr Frank Madill. He was the Minister for Police and Emergency Services.

The first chief was David Wells. The chief in 2008 was Chris Wilson, 2 Grant Hawkes, 3 Adam Hall, 4 Chris Suckling. The leading fire fighters were Micheal Olive, Olive Torenius and Carmen Zeralla. In total, there were 37 people in the fire brigade in 2008.

There are 3 fire trucks in the station. The volunteers use these to do local burns and train for what they do.

From 2001 to 2007 there had been 453 calls. The biggest house fire was at Paneminner Street on the 27 October 2006.

The hottest fire was at Scenic Drive, Lewisham.

The biggest MVA Arthur Hwy.

Destiny Dance

Destiny started in 2000 and has now been running for 9 years. It started when Tammy Mason and Naomi Grist wanted to give the community a place to dance for fun not competition. They both had a passion to teach dancing and they wanted to share that with others.

 They saw that Destiny could be a place not only to develop dance skills but confidence too. They could inspire children to do their best and reach their full potential.

They were given $17,500 by the government to build a studio just off Station Lane at the Youth and Community Centre in Sorell. All the profits go back to Destiny to buy costumes and tea and coffee for the parents attending.

If they get any extra money they donate it to their sponsor child or to the community. Destiny has recently moved to the Midway Point community hall at the top of Raynors Road. Now there is only one teacher, Tammy Mason, and she teaches preschool to adults!

Animal Hospital

The Animal Hospital was first built around 1986 then rebuilt in 2004. It got rebuilt so that people had better service for their sick animals. They have a bigger operating room and bigger working space than before. It took many builders including the staff members to rebuild.

Rob the manager, in 2008, wanted to be a doctor when he was 4 years of age then he realised that it was too much to have a human’s life in his hands so he decided to be a vet. He had to go to university for 5 years.

At the Animal Hospital they get 25-30 animals in a day, Mainly dogs and cats but other unusual animals like snakes, ducks, echidnas, rats, falcons, eagles, devils, quolls, cows, horses, ferrets and many others are brought in to be checked.

Some people say that cats don’t have 9 lives but in fact they do. We asked if they had any bad accidents and Rob said, “Yes, we have and its very devastating.”

The Animal Hospital will make sure that your pets are well looked after. You can get all kinds of supplies for your pets. Any pet that you have that is sick or injured be sure to take it to the Animal Hospital.